2018 Trademark Weakness Trend Carries Over to 2019

In 2018, we wrote frequently on the strength trend we saw emerging from the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decisions. The emerging trend was that in order to demonstrate conceptual weakness a trademark applicant had to be able to introduce a minimum of 10 third-party registrations for marks: (1) sharing the same term; and (2) registered for identical or related goods or services. The ability to meet this minimum threshold had a direct bearing on the success of one of the more common arguments made by trademark applicants to overcome a registration refusal.

In 2019, we have seen the first TTAB case to carry over this trend. Morganti Flavio Innovaciones Gastronomicas, S.L. applied to register the mark PINKCOW & Design for, among other goods, “soft drinks.” Anticipating a potential issue with Red Bull GmbH, Morganti voluntarily excluded “energy drinks” from its entire goods description in International Class 32. The Trademark Office found no issue with Morganti’s PINKCOW & Design mark and published the mark for opposition.

Red Bull, on the other hand, had an issue with Morganti’s application and opposed the registration of its mark. Red Bull alleged that the PINCOW & Design mark was likely to cause confusion with its prior registered marks RED BULL for, among other goods, “soft drinks.”

Morganti unsuccessfully argued that Red Bull’s product was an energy drink not a soft drink. Therefore, the goods descriptions at issue were legally identical because they both included the phrase “soft drinks” and the evidence showed that Red Bull’s product satisfies the ordinary definition of an “energy drink” and “soft drink.”

Red Bull was able to demonstrate that its RED BULL was commercially strong. Consequently, Morganti had to demonstrate the conceptual weakness of the RED BULL mark to counteract Red Bull’s evidence. Unfortunately, Morganti fell two short of the minimum number of the third-party marks target with a showing of eight.

Because the Board found that Red Bull’s mark was strong and the goods at issue were legally idential, Red Bull’s mark was entitled to a broad scope of rights. Those rights extended to Marganti’s PINKCOW mark, and so the TTAB granted Red Bull’s opposition.

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