A Deep Dive on the Relatedness of Goods and Services Factor

The relatedness of goods and services factor is very important in the likelihood of confusion analysis. Indeed, the fundamental inquiry mandated by Section 2(d) of the Trademark Act goes to the cumulative effect of differences in the essential characteristics of the goods and differences in the marks. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board issued a decision on New Year’s Eve that closely examined the essential characteristics of the goods because the marks at issue were identical.

Costa Farms, LLC applied to register the mark GROW WITH US (in standard characters) for “live flowers and living plants.” The Trademark Office refused registration based on a prior registration for the identical GROW WITH US mark for “distributorship services in the field of wholesale horticulture supplies and accessories.” Costa Farms eventually appealed the registration refusal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board primarily arguing that live flowers and living plants are unrelated goods to distributorship services in the horticulture field.

The Trademark Office compares the goods and services set forth in an application and a registration to determine whether they are similar, commercially related, or travel in the same trade channels. Goods and services dealing with or related to those goods can be found to be related. Relatedness will not be found when the goods or services at issue only chare a relationship with a broad category of goods.

In the GROW WITH US case, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board found that “live flowers and living plants” on the one hand and “distributorship services in the field of wholesale horticulture supplies and accessories” on the other hand share only a relationship with horticulture, which is insufficient to find the goods and services are related. Costa Farms argued and presented evidence that “horticultural supplies” are “hard-good inputs needed in horticultural endeavors” not live plants and flowers. However, Costa Farms’ evidence also included that “horticultural endeavors” include growing live plants and flowers. It seems like hard-good inputs used to grow live plants and flowers have a commercial relationship with living plants and flowers, but apparently not according to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

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