Does an Acronym Make a Good Name and Trademark

Weight Watchers announced its rebranding to WW and the launch of a new tagline Wellness that Works, which set off the debate about whether this was a wise move. Weight Watchers was founded in 1963 and currently operates in about 30 countries around the world. The company’s mission was to help participants lose weight by forming helpful habits, eating smarter, getting more exercise, and providing support.

In March of this year, Weight Watchers announced that it intended to enter the competitive¬†meal kit market with the likes of Blue Apron. It was reported that this step was part of CEO Mindy Grossman’s vision of rebranding the company as healthy lifestyle brand. The move to WW that stands for Wellness that Works instead of Weight Watchers is another move in the rebranding plan. But if the decision was made to move entirely away from the brand that has been used for over 50 years, moving to an acronym may not have been the best choice.

Whether you are moving to a similar acronym or an entirely new word or phrase, you will have to spend some significant money to educate the market about your new name. Distinctiveness is an important characteristic of any new name. In the naming context, distinctiveness lets you stand out from the crowd. And in the legal context, distinctiveness provides broader protectable rights.

Accordingly Acronym Finder, there are 81 different WW acronyms. There are also 202 registered trademarks for WW in the United States Patent and Trademark Office database. Not all of these registrations are in the healthy lifestyle space, but it demonstrates that consumers are exposed to a lot of WW acronyms. As a new acronym just starting out, that mean a lot of effort educate the market what your WW stands for.

Acronyms also do not solve conflicts with prior registered marks, which could be increased because of the sheer number of acronyms that are registered. Time will tell whether it was a smart move to walk away from 50 years of prior use of Weight Watchers in favor a new WW acronym or if it could have been possible to create new brand messaging using the well-known Weight Watchers mark.

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