Airline Entertainment Equipment Is Unrelated to Broadcasting Services

P.G.A. Electronic wins a rare reversal from the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board for its CARAT application. Given the surprises the Trademark Office delivers from time to time, it is possible that airline entertainment equipment could be related to television and radio broadcasting services. These goods and services could be related because they are both involved in the delivery of content to consumers. The Trademark Office has held in prior cases that when the goods or services are ingredients in or compliments to the other good or service, that is an indication of relatedness.

In In re P.G.A. Electronic, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decided whether airline entertainment equipment is related to television and radio broadcasting services. P.G.A. Electronic filed a request for extension of protection of an international registration for the mark CARAT (in stylized form) through the Madrid Protocol. P.G.A. Electronic filed the CARAT application in connection with airline entertainment equipment. The Trademark Office refused registration of the mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with a prior registered mark CARAT for radio and television broadcasting services.

The central issue in this case was the relatedness of the goods or services because the marks were virtually identical. The only difference was the stylization of the CARAT word used by P.G.A. Electronic. When the marks at issue are identical, less similarity between the goods or services at issue is required for a likelihood of confusion to exist.

The Examining Attorney offered third-party registrations for marks that covered broadcasting services and some form of content transmission.  Because of the transmission aspect of these third-party registrations did not exclude transmitting in airplanes, the Examining Attorney argued this was evidence that the goods and services at issue in the case were related.

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board agreed, but held that the Examining Attorney failed to prove that P.G.A. Electronic’s customers were airline passengers and not the technicians who install the CARAT equipment in the airplanes. Accordingly, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board held that airline entertainment equipment is unrelated to radio and television broadcasting services.

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