Consumers Likely to Confuse Coffee and Energy Drinks

In a second case this year the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board looked beyond the identifications of goods descriptions to determine whether two goods were related. David John Critchley registered the mark KICK ASS (in standard characters) for, among other goods, energy drinks. Kicking Horse Coffee Co. Ltd. petitioned to cancel Mr. Critchley’s registration based on its prior rights in KICK ASS for coffee.

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board found that the marks were similar and Mr. Critchley failed to produce more than 10 third-party registrations for coffee or goods related to coffee to establish that Kick Ass Coffee’s rights in KICK ASS were limited to coffee. The disputed factor was the relatedness of the goods.

The Board stated as it always does that the relatedness of goods is determined based on the goods or services as described in the application or registration. In this case, coffee and energy drinks are not technical goods in nature, nor are these words vague. An “energy drink” is defined as “any of various types of beverage that are considered a source of energy, especially a soft drink containing a high percentage of sugar and/or caffeine or other stimulant.” It is common knowledge that coffee contains caffeine and is consumed for a source of energy.

Coffee falls squarely within the definition of an “energy drink.” Nevertheless, the Board considered evidence of the real world marketplace to determine if identical marks were used on coffee and on energy drinks. Because there were numerous examples showing this, the Board concluded that coffee and energy drinks are related.

On May 5, 2006, David John Critchley filed a trademark application for KICK ASS in connection with, among other goods, energy drinks. Then for 8 years Mr. Critchley battled to acquire his registration going all the way through an ex parte appeal. His KICK ASS application was published for opposition on April 8, 2014 and matured into a registration on June 24, 2014. Then, shortly after his registration issued, on September 10, 2014 Kicking Horse Coffee Co. Ltd. petitioned to cancel his registration.

What is amazing about this prosecution history is that the application was filed on intended use of the mark in the United States. Why someone would fight for 12 years over a mark that is not even being used in the United States is peculiar. The amount of money spent by the applicant is simply not justified.

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