Handling Difficult Conversations About Trademark Search Results

If you are conducting a trademark search for someone else, difficult conversations about one of the trademarks being searched is going to happen. As of July 2, 2018, there are 312,339 pending trademark applications and 2,386,268 live registrations in the United States Patent and Trademark Office TESS database. That is almost 2,700,000 records that need to be considered when selecting a trademark and it only takes 1 record to prevent the registration of a proposed mark.

Inc. published an article about The No. 1 Mistake People Make When Handling Tough Conversations. According to the author John Hall – CEO & co-founder of Influence & Co. – the No. 1 mistake leaders make is worrying about their own performance instead of the team. Some of Mr. Hall’s tips are transferable to a client relationship, but there is one tip that makes a big difference in the client context. You can avoid difficult conversations if you demonstrate you are invested in and care about your client by adding value about the search results beyond just the results. In other words, show the client that you tried to find ways to make sure the name they fall in love with is available for their use.

To add this value requires a more critical analysis of the search results. It means that there may be a way around a search result colored red. Or that a small change to a mark may avoid an issue with a search result colored yellow.

If you are a naming firm or professional trademark searcher, here is strategy to employ to demonstrate to your clients that you are invested in their business while using your time and money in the most cost-effective way. First, use a trademark search engine to conduct the preliminary trademark search. When reviewing the search results, sort them by green first, then red, and finally yellow. Set the green marks aside, and turn your attention to the red marks. Review the list of red marks for any you suspect your client would really like. Put those list of red marks in separate list. Then turn your attention to the yellow marks. Similar to the red marks, make a list of the yellow marks you suspect your client would really like.

If you do not have a relationship with a trademark attorney, then you should get one. Send the list of red marks and yellow marks to the trademark attorney along with the relevant search results. Have the trademark attorney reviewing the prosecution history for the marks to determine if he or she sees a potential path to registration for any of the marks on the list. If a path exists, have the trademark attorney provide the patch details.

When you structuring a relationship with a trademark attorney this way, you maximize the value the trademark attorney brings to the clearance process. You are not wasting money on a search, which can be done in a more cost-effective way.

Through this process you will avoid difficult conversations with your client because they will see the extra mile you went to ensure they can use a name they ultimately fall in love with.

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