Dunkin’ Donuts Drops DONUTS Says Call Us Dunkin

On the heels of the Weight Watchers’ rebrand to the acronym WW, Dunkin’ Donuts announced that it is dropping the term DONUTS from its mark. Starting in January, the doughnut shop will roll out a new logo, store signage, and advertising, but will keep its orange and pink color scheme. But the change is not sitting well with all Dunkin patrons who have a connection to the misspelled DONUT, which is created when the brand launched in 1950.

Ordinarily, deleting non-distinct matter from a composite trademark does not affect the overall commercial impression of the mark. In fact, the Trademark Manual of Examining Procedures states that non-distinct matter should be excluded from a trademark drawing when an application is filed. But something is being lost in the DUNKIN’ DONUTS case because over the years consumers have come to recognize the misspelled word as indicating Dunkin’ Donuts as the source of goods or services displaying that term. And consumers are capable of identifying the same source through more than one trademark. So it seems like Dunkin’ Donuts is losing something by dropping the misspelled DONUTS from its mark.

Dunkin’ Donuts said the reason for dropping DONUTS is to highlight a wider array of menu items and appear to a younger generation. Vox reported what it perceives as a trend for established brands to rebrand to something more “vague.” In the case of an established brand dropping a non-distinctive term like in the case of JO-ANN FABRICS rebranding to just JOANN, the mark is not getting more vague. It retains the distinctive portion that consumers rely on to identify the source of the goods or services.

A trademark is not supposed to say everything about a company’s business. That is what advertising copy is for. The trademark is supposed to represent the reputation of the company, and serve as an indicator of the quality of the goods or services. In other words, when consumers see DUNKIN’ they don’t need to immediately know that the company sells doughnuts, coffee, sandwiches, salads, etc. When they see the term DUNKIN on, for example, a rice cake, they will presume the rice cake is delicious because of their positive experience with the DUNKIN brand.

Leave a Reply