Electric Bicycles and Bicycle Apparel Confusable as to Source

Luna Cycle filed a trademark application to register the mark LUNACYCLE in standard character form for electric bicycles and replacement parts for electric bikes. The United States Patent and Trademark Office refused registration of Luna Cycle’s mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with the prior registered mark LUNA & Design for women’s bicycle apparel and accessories.

When it comes to assessing the relatedness of the goods, the issue is not whether purchasers would confuse the goods, but rather whether there is a likelihood of confusion as to the source of these goods. Electric bicycles are human-powered bicycles with integrated electric motors to provide a cyclist with additional power and speed. They are marketed towards recreational cyclists.

The Trademark Office offered evidence from brick-and-morter and online retail bicycle stores offering for sale electric bicycles and women’s bicycle apparel. These retailers are not big box retailers but speciality bicycles stores, which the Board found persuasive evidence to conclude that the goods at issue were complimentary.

With respect to the similarity of the marks, Luna Cycle argued that its mark is a telescoped word LUNACYCLE composed of LUNACY and CYCLE. The Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure defines a telescoped word as one that comprises two or more words that share letters (e.g., SUPERINSE or HAMERICAN). And while the Board found that the LUNACYCLE mark is likely to be perceived as a telescoped form it nonetheless found that consumers would treat it like compound word comprising LUNA and CYCLE. The Board hypothesized a scenario where Luna Cycle emphasized the letter “L” in Luna and letter “C” in Cycle because standard character drawing was claimed, and then backed it up with Luna Cycle’s own specimen of use that showed very emphasis the Board assumed could happen. Because the dominant portion of the marks was LUNA, the Board found the marks created overall similar commercial impressions.

Maybe, Luna Cycle would be able to salvage a win by demonstrating the prior registered LUNA & Design mark was weak; thus, entitled to a narrow scope of protection because of the numerous third-party registrations for LUNA. Luna Cycle submitted 100 third-party registrations for marks displaying the LUNA term in International Class 25 for some form of apparel. Several of these third-party registration were for women’s clothing. But because none of these registrations were for women’s¬†bicycle¬†apparel, the Board discounted all of the 100 third-party registrations, which seems like a harsh result.

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