Addition of House Mark Did Not Eliminate Confusion

To add or not to add the house mark, that is the question. This is a good question because the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board has gone both ways on the question. In some cases, the Board has found that the addition of a house mark is sufficient to avoid confusion, and in others the Board has found that it aggravates the likelihood of confusion. In a recent decision involving the COCOON BY SEALY mark, the Board gave us some guidance on when to add the house mark.

Cocoon International Sales, LLC filed an application to register the mark COCOON BY SEALY (in standard characters) for “mattresses; pillows.” The Trademark Office refused registration of this mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with the prior registered mark SLEEP COCOON (in standard characters) for “mattresses; pillows.”

The Trademark Office found the goods are identical and because the descriptions are unrestricted the channels of trade and class of consumers factor overlap. Cocoon International Sales tried the conceptual weakness argument but was only able to offer 4 third-party registrations (but in reality only two because three of the four were owned by the same entity), a number well below the 10 minimum we have posited is required.

Facing an uphill battle, Cocoon International Sales tried to distinguish its mark by arguing the addition of the famous SEALY house mark was enough to tip the mark similarity factor in its favor along with the ultimate finding of no likelihood of confusion. In finding that it did not adequately distinguish the COCOON marks, the Board identified when a house mark can distinguish two marks:

  1. When there are recognizable differences between the marks, then adding a house mark may help.
  2. When the marks are highly suggestive or merely descriptive, then adding a house mark may help.
  3. When the marks are conceptually weak, then adding a house mark may help.
  4. When the house mark precedes instead of follows the mark, adding it may help.

Unfortunately for Cocoon International Sales the Board found that COCOON was “mildly suggestive” of mattresses and pillows. Therefore, adding SEALY to the mark was not enough to avoid a likelihood of confusion finding.

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