Lesson on Distinguishing Identical Words With Designs

It is a well settled principle that in the case of composite marks containing both words and a design, the verbal portion of the mark is the one most likely to indicate the origin of the goods. But that does not mean that a design is incapable of distinguishing two trademarks that use identical words. Whether the capability exists depends on how the design is used.

ChuChu TV Studios a/k/a ChuChu TV filed an application register the mark ABBY and a design of a hippopotamus in connection with various clothing items and plush toys. The Trademark Office refused registration of ChuChu TV’s mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with the prior registered mark ABBY (in standard characters) for a variety of dolls. The Trademark Office found that dolls and plush toys are related, much like it found plush toys and toy figures were related about four months ago.

Despite the relatedness of the goods, ChuChu TV argued that its hippopotamus design that dominated the word ABBY by a large margin was sufficient to distinguish its mark from the prior registration for just the word. Unfortunately, the Board disagreed.

For a design to distinguish the use of identical words, it is helpful that the words are difficult to distinguish from the design. In such a case, the design is more likely to be perceived by consumers as dominating the words. In ChuChu TV’s case, the ABBY term was clearly separate from the hippopotamus design. In fact, the term ABBY appeared directly below the design.

As trademark searchers it is important to understand when a design is capable of distinguishing the use of two identical words. When reviewing trademark search results, we may be able to justify recommending to a client an otherwise problematic word mark.

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