Lessons from a Rare Trademark Refusal Reversal

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board issues a trademark refusal reversal only about 10% of the time. So when a trademark refusal reversal occurs it is worth spending some time figuring out what lead to the reversal.

Soletanche Freyssinet applied to register the mark CMC (in standard characters) for “non-metallic underground columns for land stabilization and reinforcement that are fabricated and installed on-site.” The CMC application began with a broader goods description but was narrowed to the current description following a first Office Action. Two of the descriptions included in the original description were “reinforcement rods not of metal” and “non-metallic materials for building.”

The Trademark Office refused registration of Soletanche Freyssinet’s CMC mark based on a prior registered, identical mark CMC (in standard characters) for “full line of metals in sheet, rod, bar, angle, round, beam, castellated beam, cellular beam, flat beam, joist, strip, tube, plate, billet, square, and wire, form.” There were no limitations in the cited CMC mark and Soletanche Freyssinet did not petition to partially cancel the cited CMC mark to have any limitations imposed on the prior registration.

Instead, Soletanche Freyssinet focused on narrowing its identification to the true nature of its goods. In doing so, it introduced a level technicality that would allow the Board to consider evidence instead of relying solely on the words in the description of the goods to decide the relatedness of goods factor. Soletanche Freyssinet offered the declaration of one of its executives who explained the nature of its goods and how they differed from those goods offered under the cited CMC mark.

The Trademark Office did not offer any evidence only argument and speculation. It appears that the Trademark Office continued to argue the descriptions that Soletanche Freyssinet deleted from its application and not the amended description. For example, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board quickly dismissed the argument the rods identified by the cited CMC mark could be used for stabilization just like Soletanche Freyssinet’s non-metallic rods. In reality, the “columns” identified in Soletanche Freyssinet’s application could have been made of non-metallic rods, but the Trademark Office did not offer evidence to establish this fact.

The Trademark Office offered evidence that in a general construction context, beams and columns are used to support other structures. But because Soletanche Freyssinet’s description identified that its columns were “fabricated and installed on-site” the general construction context was irrelevant. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board required the Trademark Office to offer evidence in the relevant context.

Starting broad is still a good filing strategy, but voluntarily narrowing the description if a registration refusal issues is important. When making the amendment, introducing where the goods are sold or services are performed can be helpful. Finally, support the amendment with evidence. The Board, in this case, seemed to look at the declaration from Soletanche Freyssinet to understand why the particular words were used in the amended description.

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