Louis Vuitton Get’s It Half Right and Loses APOGEE Appeal

Louis Vuitton Malletier appears to employ a common trademark application filing strategy, which is to prepare the trademark application with broad goods descriptions. From there the broad description can be narrowed in an attempt to avoid a registration refusal should the Trademark Office issue an office action. We dare to say that most trademark applicants follow this filing strategy, which is why trademark searches must use broad terms when conducting their trademark searches. But narrowing a goods description alone is no substitute for a proper trademark search and trademark clearance opinion. Louis Vuitton learned this lesson the hard way in a recent case.

Louis Vuitton applied to register the mark APOGEE (in standard characters) for, among other goods, perfumes. The Trademark Office refused registration of this mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with a prior registered mark APHOGEE (in standard characters) for “Hair care lotions; hair conditioners; hair creams; hair mousse; hair oils; hair shampoo; hair sprays; hair styling preparations; non-medicated hair treatment preparations for cosmetic purposes; non-medicated preparations all for the care of skin, hair, and scalp; hair moisturizers.”

Realizing that its description was too broad, Louis Vuitton voluntarily amended its description to narrow the channels of trade and classes of consumers to “non-professional use and sold only within Louis Vuitton Malletier stores, on Louis Vuitton Malletier’s website, and within Louis Vuitton Malletier’s store-within-store partnerships with high-end retail stores within Louis Vuitton Malletier’s exclusive distributor network.” Voluntarily narrowing its description was a must because the evidence of legion that it is common for perfume brands to also offer shampoos and other personal products under the same mark. However, Louis Vuitton’s choice of limitation begs the question of whether pursuing the application as hard as it did was worth it.

The limitation made by Louis Vuitton means that its rights in the APOGEE mark would exist only in the channels where only its products are sold. There is no opportunity for another company’s branded product to appear at the point of sale. Strength is not transferable from one well-known brand to another. And at least according to the Amazon reviews, the APHOGEE brand receives positive reviews. Difficult to see where Louis Vuitton’s hard would emanate from in this case. So while recognizing that an amendment is necessary, it is equally important to ensure that the proposed amendment does not render the resulting registration borderline worthless.

Despite the detailed description volunteered by Louis Vuitton, the company did not seek a corresponding amendment in the APHOGEE registration. Accordingly, the APHOGEE registration remained broad enough to include stores and channels where only Louis Vuitton goods are sold. Moreover, Louis Vuitton did not offer any evidence that APHOGEE was weak in its entirety or partially. Accordingly, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board affirmed the registration refusal.

Leave a Reply