Interworking of the Similarity of the Marks Factor

A recent Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decision is a good example of how the similarity of the marks, relatedness of the goods or services, and strength factors work together. Tai Fook Jewellery Company Limited sought to register the mark T MARK (in standard characters) for, among other goods, jewelry. The Trademark Office refused registration of Chow’s trademark application on the ground that its mark was likely to cause confusion with a prior registered mark TJ MARC & Design also for jewelry. .

Chow made the same losing argument about the sophistication of the consumers claiming that jewelry is personal; therefore, consumers will exercise care when making a purchasing decision. However, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board said what it was said numerous times before that if the restriction does not appear in the goods or service description, then it will not read a limitation in to the description. Accordingly, the Board found the goods are legally related.

When goods or services are legally related, the channels of trade and classes of consumers are deemed to overlap. Moreover, less similarity between the marks at issue is required in order for a likelihood of confusion to exist.

Chow also made the common losing argument about the strength factor. Chow introduced a table of six third-party registrations – four shy of the 10 we believe is the minimum required to establish a weak mark – and then only one third-party registration containing the letters TJ and covering jewelry. Therefore, the rights in the TJ MARC & Design were not limited to a close representation of its mark.

When it came to the similarity of the marks factor, the Board stated that marks must be considered in light of the fallibility of memory. The proper focus is on the recollection of the average purchaser who normally retains a general rather than specific impression of trademarks.

Because the goods were legally identical, the fact that the marks began with the letter “T” and ended with the word MARK or MARC made the marks more similar than dissimilar. The crown design element and use of TJ instead of just the letter “T” were insufficient to distinguish the two marks because the TJ MARC & Design trademark was not weak, and consumer focus on the literal elements of a trademark before any design element (although this is debatable).

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