Using Sans-Serif Font Makes a Bland not a Brand

"Brandless website showing sans serif brand"

A recent Fast Company article identified displaying a trademark in sans-serif font as the hottest branding trend in 2018. If you were part of this trend, the article labeled your trademark a bland not a brand. According to the article, blanding occurs when the trademark lacks any meaningful differentiation from its competitors. Even a coined trademark is incapable of being a brand if it is not accompanied by something that makes is visually pop. The author says “[t]he point is differentiation; by definition, that’s what branding is.”

We have the large tech companies:  Apple, Google, Aribnb, and Uber, to thank for this trend. Because of the nature of their businesses and market status, just the word in sans-serif font functions as a brand not a bland. Their success has spawned a legion of imitators who can’t do the same thing. “The problem is that the blands haven’t earned the branding they ape.”

The article alludes to differentiation occurring through more than just sight, which is absolutely true. All the messaging done through advertising and public relations ultimately is embodied in the trademark, and that is what consumers recognize when they see a trademark even if it is just the word. If your brand strategy is to use the trademark in a sans-serif font, that is perfectly okay so long as you are using other collateral to differentiate your business and to tell your brand story. The experience consumers have with your business will influence the differentiation in the marketplace more than any visual cues your trademark may possess.

For example, look at the evolution of the Google trademark. The color placement and font style has changed over the years, but that is pretty much it. Starting out, the GOOGLE trademark could have been considered a bland not a brand by the article’s standard. Over time, Google has clearly become a well-known brand that consumers trust regardless of how the GOOGLE term is presented.

The question for young companies is whether you need eye-catching branding to begin with or if can build the differentiation you need other ways. What is important for young companies to keep in mind is that it takes time to build a brand and is something that can’t be rushed. Patience is key and so is the commitment to sticking with the brand strategy.

All Brands are Trademarks, But Not All Trademarks are Brands

"brands trademarks"

What comes first the trademarks or the brands? These words are not synonymous, and understanding the difference is important. Vocabulary in general is critically important to understanding new topics and being able to converse intelligently about them.

The Federal Trademark Act defines what constitutes a trademark very broadly. “A ‘trademark‘ includes any word, name, symbol, or device, or any combination thereof – used by a person – to identify and distinguish his or her goods . . . from those manufactured or sold by others and to indicate the source of the goods, even if that source if unknown.”

Traditionally, a trademark is thought of as words and designs, but it can include smells, tastes, colors, shapes, touch, and sounds. What determines if any of this matter can function as a trademark is whether consumers rely on it when making purchasing decisions. Consumers come to rely on any matter when making purchasing decisions by having experiences with the matter. Those experiences can be good or bad, but those experiences are embodied in the trademark and the trademark starts to represent and stand for those collective experiences. The collective experiences embodied in a trademark is referred to as the goodwill associated with the trademark.

When someone mentions the word brand they are referring to “the sum total fo the thoughts, opinions, associations, and experiences people have with your company.” Brand is more synonymous with goodwill than it is the word trademark. And because a brand requires consumer experiences, all brands are trademarks but not all trademarks are brands.

A company can do a lot to influence the experiences consumers have with the trademark. For example, you can have attractive packaging and marketing collateral, and have excellent customer service. All these things positively reflect on the company and create a quality expectation by consumers every time they encounter the trademark. When this expectation is created, you then have a brand.

The path from trademark to brand depends in part from the selection of your starting point. Select matter that consumers immediately recognize as a trademark, and your path will be shorter than if you select matter that takes time for consumers to recognize is a trademark in the first place.