Reinforcement that Trademark Classes are Irrelevant

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board has said before that trademark classes are irrelevant to determining likelihood of confusion. A recent decision involving the SWISS certification mark reinforces this point. Pearl 9 Group, LLC filed a trademark application to register the mark I.W. SUISSE for “clocks and watches; parts for watches; watch bands and straps; ***; timepiece dial faces, and parts for timepieces ***” in International Class 14. The Trademark Office refused registration of Pearl 9’s mark on the ground that it was likely to cause confusion with the prior registered certification mark SWISS for “horological and chronometric instruments, namely, watches, clocks and their component parts and fittings thereof” in Class A.

The Board held that the classification as a certification mark has very little effect on our determination as to whether or not there is a likelihood of confusion. Because the certification mark owner does not itself use the mark, the question of whether there is a likelihood of confusion is based on a comparison of the mark as applied to the goods or services of the certification mark users.

Using trademark classes in a trademark search only helps to narrow the universe of marks that trademark searchers need to evaluate. From there, the trademark searcher is left to sift through the results using only intuition to determine whether anyone of those marks is likely to prevent the registration of the proposed mark being searched.

And any software program that includes only the similarity of the marks and irrelevant International Class numbers yet provides a “score” for the search results begs the question of what that score represents. If all the search is telling is that there are similar marks registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, that information is largely unhelpful and something you can discover by yourself and for free.

And over reliance on trademark classes will result in overlooked trademarks that may be consequential marks in the likelihood of confusion analysis. That may have been the case in the Pearl 9 case. Focusing solely on International Class 14 where jewelry and watches are classified, would have resulted in missing the SWISS certification mark in Class A.

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