Perplexing Trademark Office: Clothespins Related to Scissors

A recent Trademark Trial and Appeal Board decision where the Board found clothespins related to scissors again demonstrates that relying on International Class numbers in a trademark search rather than prior case decisions involving the relatedness of goods factor will lead to wrong search results. Ing. Monika Norkova filed a request for extension of protection of her International Registration to the United States for the mark ZIPZAP (in standard characters) for “drying racks for laundry; clothes[pins]” in International Class 12. The Trademark Office refused registration of this mark.

The Trademark Office argued that Ms. Norkova’s ZIPZAP mark was likely to cause confusion with a prior registered mark ZIPZAP (also in standard characters) for – are you ready – “scissors, in particular hair cutting scissors, manicure scissors, sheet-metal scissors, poultry shears, cable scissors; tree pruning shears; nippers, nail nippers, cuticle nippers; files; utility knives and pliers” in International Class 8.  While it is true that when the marks at issue are identical, less similarity is necessary in order for a likelihood of confusion to exist, one would like to think that hair cutting scissors or tree pruning shears are sufficiently different from drying racks and clothespins that confusion is unlikely.

Despite citing the rule that the words “in particular” clarify and narrow overly broad goods or services descriptions, none of the used based evidence offered by the Trademark Office involve any of the specific types of goods identified in the cited registration. Nevertheless, the Board found that because some scissors are marketed under the same brand as a laundry drying rack, then all scissors must be related in the minds of consumers to laundry drying racks and clothespins.

And what’s even more important is that it does not matter if you agree with the decision or not. In fact, we guess that most people reading this post disagree with the decision. But it’s a decision that is not going to be overturned and that could produce a negative outcome for a naming decision if you are focused on International Class Numbers and not prior case decisions involving relatedness of goods or services findings. In fact, the USPTO does not identify International Class 12 as a Coordinated Class to International Class 8.

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